News

 

Three Rivers Land Trust conserves 89 acres on Deep River in Moore County

Three Rivers Land Trust is excited to announce the permanent conservation of 89 acres located along the Deep River in Moore County. The Deep River has long been a focal area for conservation efforts for the land trust, and is designated by North Carolina as a High Quality Watershed. This section of the Deep River is also identified as a natural heritage natural area known more commonly as Deep River Below High Falls Aquatic Habitat. The federally listed as endangered Cape Fear Shiner has been documented in the river just off this tract.

“We were happy to work with this landowner to complete their conservation vision for the property,” states Executive Director Travis Morehead. “This section of the Deep River is particularly important from a water quality and a recreation perspective, and we are glad to see another property here permanently protected.”

The primary purpose of the conservation easement is to protect and enhance the natural features and resources of the wetlands and riparian areas associated with Deep River and unnamed tributaries. The easement will also improve and maintain water quality, control sediment runoff, and provide habitat for unique native flora and fauna that rely on the riparian ecosystems.

Funding for this acquisition was provided by the North Carolina Clean Water Management Trust Fund and Anne Leahy in honor of her mother Jane M Mueller.

To learn more about how to protect your own property, or how to support Three Rivers Land Trust in our conservation mission, contact Crystal Cockman at 704-647-0302 or crystal@threeriverslandtrust.org

About Three Rivers Land Trust

Three Rivers Land Trust works with private landowners and public agencies to conserve the most important natural, scenic, agricultural, and historic places in a 15-county region of the Piedmont and Sandhills of North Carolina. Since 1995, the Land Trust has worked to offer reasonable and attractive options to landowners who want to conserve their lands for future generations to enjoy. Our mission is to work thoughtfully and selectively with property owners to conserve our lands, vistas, and the essential nature of our region. For more information about Three Rivers Land Trust, please contact the Land Trust at 704-647-0302 or michael@threeriverslandtrust.org or visit their website at www.threeriverslandtrust.org

Books Take You Anywhere!

As a small non-profit, we are acutely aware of the challenges facing small businesses in our communities right now. We urge each of you to do something each day to support local businesses or organizations that might be negatively affected by the outbreak. At the heart of everything, we are all in this together. In that light, we wanted to share some of our favorite books that reflect conservation issues, with links to two of our favorite local bookstores The Country Bookshop in Southern Pines, and the South Main Book Company, in Salisbury.

With the state under a stay-at-home order, books can be a great way to pass the time or for a little escapism. Kimberly Taws, general manager of the Country Bookshop, has noticed many people purchasing books about nature, gardening, and “classics that they never got around to reading.” All in all, it seems, most “people just really want a good, engrossing book right now,” Taws says.

The Country Bookshop in Southern Pines has adapted to the COVID-19 pandemic by offering curbside service and free local delivery to customers to who order online or over the phone.  Meanwhile, The South Main Book Company is doing its part by making a donation to a Salisbury-based Pack The Pantry Program with every gift card sold, while also making personal deliveries to customers’ mailboxes. The good news is that as the Governor considers bookstores essential businesses, so they will remain open during the state-wide shelter in place order.

Read on for a selection of books that reflect the conservation spirit of the Land Trust, with links to both bookstores. We hope these picks expand your understanding of a wide-range of conservation issues, and also keeps you company in the days ahead.

Do you have books you think should be on this list? Send us and email and we’ll be sure to add it to the website!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guest Blog Post (UNC-TV’s Tom Earnhardt)

During the next few weeks and months while many of us are “hunkered down,” it is important to remember that the world around us is still beautiful, ever changing, and very much alive.  Across North Carolina new wildflowers will pop up every week, different birds arrive and depart each month, and beaches, rivers, and forests can provide sanctuary and respite in these difficult times.

Even though we may be physically isolated, we are supported by our families, friends, and by an unseen army of community heroes. Support and solace can also be found in the natural world around us. Several of you have observed that springtime is your season of healing and renewal.

March and April are major transition months in natural North Carolina. It is the time of year when change is most visible. Gray and brown landscapes can turn chartreuse…and then green…in a couple of days. These transitions happen so fast that we see only a fraction of what is occurring just a few steps from our doors…and in the streams, fields and forests of our Tar Heel universe. While we are hunkered down, the natural world is still a very busy place!

Each plant and animal has a role in its community, “tasks” to perform and a reason to be here. As much as we know about quantum physics, artificial intelligence, and the cosmos, we still have much to learn from nature about collaboration on this tiny rock called Earth. Ever the optimist, I celebrate the extreme natural diversity found in North Carolina knowing that it improves quality of life and provides comfort for each of us.

After many years of observing North Carolina‘s “lifescape” (the interdependence of plants and animals) with UNC-TV, I still experience the same curiosity and awe that I felt at age 12. My passion is rooted in small farm ponds in the Piedmont, tiny trout streams near Brevard, tidal pools in Carteret County, the mysteries of a longleaf savanna, and the miracle of Appalachian wildflowers. As you will see in the images below, nature is already decorating the land, rehearsing songs and preparing for our return.

Health, hope and joy to you and your families,

Tom Earnhardt

 

 

Our “birds of winter”—ducks, swans, and snow geese—will depart coastal wetlands in early/mid March and fly to the far North.

 

 

In longleaf pine forests near Sanford, you’ll see the “fiddleheads” of various ferns unfurling in late March.

 

In the same places look for one of our most dazzling wildflowers, the 4-inch dwarf violet iris (Iris verna) emerging from the detritus of winter.

 

At the end of March, a newly arrived osprey couple in Bertie County, at the west end of the Albemarle Sound, is already squabbling over family meals and housekeeping chores.

 

In mountain cove forests, North Carolina’s native orchids will begin appearing in late April…

Salamanders of every shape and color (over 60 species!) will be active in Tar Heel creeks, ponds, and under damp leaves…

 

For much of North Carolina, 2020 is just beginning…

 

Nature Bingo!

Here is a little something to entertain you and your young ones during this difficult time while practicing social distancing!

We’ve created two scavenger hunts for you to print and circle the things you find – when you get four in a row you can be entered into a drawing to win TRLT swag and gift certificates. A special prize will be given to those who find everything in the hunt!

How to Enter:

To play this fun game of nature bingo at home, check out the following criteria. As long as you meet them, you’ll be entered in a drawing to win prizes!

It’s easy to enter. Here are the rules:

  • Post a photo or video of your completed scorecard on Facebook or Instagram, using the hashtag #explorewithtrlt
  • You must make your post public so we can see it and others can too.
  • You must post your photos before May 15, 2020.
  • You can share as many photos or videos as you like. However, a maximum of three entries per person will be entered in the drawing for prizes.
  • Parents may submit entries on behalf of their children.
  • If you’re not on social media, you can email your submission to ellie@threeriverslandtrust.org
  • To win prizes, you must be a resident of North Carolina
  • TRLT may share your photo or video online, with credit to you as the creator.

The Prize:

A drawing will be held after the contest deadline on May 15, 2020, and will be for a $50 gift certificate to REI, a retailer selling sporting goods, camping gear, travel equipment, and clothing. Special prizes go out to anyone who completes the whole sheet, finding every item and crossing it off, and for anyone who finds everything on both scorecards. Have fun and good luck!

Nature – Good For The Soul

“Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find reserves of strength that will endure as long as life lasts.” – Rachel Carson

As communities increasingly practice social distancing and restaurants, bars, recreation facilities, and other businesses temporarily close, we’re reminded that  nature  can be a source of peace in the days ahead. We can find joy in the forests, trails, backyards, trees, gardens, streams, and other natural areas we love.

Being outside can be restorative. It can provide some respite from stressful, busy lives, and for many of us, the outdoors is simply where we’d rather be. So, during this tough time, it’s only natural to want to head outside. And for those who are able, we encourage you to do so.

Being in nature, or even viewing scenes of nature, reduces anger, fear, and stress and increases pleasant feelings. Exposure to nature not only makes you feel better emotionally, it contributes to your physical wellbeing, reducing blood pressure, heart rate, muscle tension, and the production of stress hormones. It may even reduce mortality, according to scientists such as public health researchers Stamatakis and Mitchell.

In one study, 95% of those interviewed said their mood improved after spending time outside, changing from depressed, stressed, and anxious to more calm and balanced. Other studies by Ulrich, Kim, and Cervinka show that time in nature or scenes of nature are associated with a positive mood, and psychological wellbeing, meaningfulness, and vitality.

 

While we want you to get outside and soak up the benefits of the great outdoors, here are some suggestions for practicing social distancing to help stem the spread of Covid-19:

  • Stay local as much as possible to avoid spreading the virus any further
  • Maintain at least a six-foot distance from others
  • Maintain excellent hygiene especially while traveling to and from the outdoors
  • Make sure to take proper precautions by packing all necessary safety equipment and letting someone know where you are going, what your plans are, and when they should expect you back (and don’t forget to tell them when you do get back!).

Some ways to enjoy nature from the comfort of your home:

  • Our friends at the National Wildlife Federation have made their Ranger Rick Magazine free online through June
  • PBS has complied these free documentaries that highlighting stunning vistas all over the world
  • Did you know you can contribute to wildlife research as a community scientist, without having to leave your home? Check out some of the nature projectsyou can assist with on Zooniverse, an online platform for volunteer-powered research that anyone can participate in!
  • Check out these virtual tours of some North Carolina State Parks
  • “iNatting” is a great solo or family activity that can be done in your backyard or out on the trails while you are#socialdistancing. iNaturalist even has an app just for kids with built in challenges, rewards, and activities called Seek:  https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/seek_app

 However you might be finding ways to explore the great outdoors, we hope you still get the chance to enjoy your love for the wildlife and wild places while staying safe and healthy.

 Catch up with us in the days ahead as we share ways you (and the kiddos) can get outside, explore nature, and enjoy the fresh air. When you head out, be sure to tag us at @threeriverslandtrust.org, and use the hashtag #dailydoseofnature to share your adventures with us.

 Happy Exploring!

The Team at Three Rivers Land Trust

 

 

Three Rivers Land Trust conserves 89 acres on Deep River in Moore County

 

 

 

March 24, 2020

Three Rivers Land Trust is excited to announce the permanent conservation of 89 acres located along the Deep River in Moore County. The Deep River has long been a focal area for conservation efforts for the land trust, and is designated by North Carolina as a High Quality Watershed. This section of the Deep River is also identified as a natural heritage natural area known more commonly as Deep River Below High Falls Aquatic Habitat. The federally listed as endangered Cape Fear Shiner has been documented in the river just off this tract.

“We were happy to work with this landowner to complete their conservation vision for the property,” states Executive Director Travis Morehead. “This section of the Deep River is particularly important from a water quality and a recreation perspective, and we are glad to see another property here permanently protected.”

The primary purpose of the conservation easement is to protect and enhance the natural features and resources of the wetlands and riparian areas associated with Deep River and unnamed tributaries. The easement will also improve and maintain water quality, control sediment runoff, and provide habitat for unique native flora and fauna that rely on the riparian ecosystems.

Funding for this acquisition was provided by the North Carolina Clean Water Management Trust Fund and Anne Leahy in honor of her mother Jane M Mueller.

To learn more about how to protect your own property, or how to support Three Rivers Land Trust in our conservation mission, contact Crystal Cockman at 704-647-0302 or crystal@threeriverslandtrust.org

Land Trust Partners with Boy Scouts to Plant Trees on Conserved Property

For Immediate Release

February 26, 2020

 

Three Rivers Land Trust’s Leopold Society hosted a tree planting for the boy scouts of Troop 442, based out of Salisbury, on Saturday, February 22nd. Twenty scouts, accompanied by scoutmasters and chaperones, gathered at a conserved property near Coddle Creek Reservoir in northern Cabarrus County to plant 100 crabapple trees.

The scouts kicked off the morning with a lesson on the purpose of a land trust and why conservation is important in rapidly developing areas. The remainder of the morning was spent digging holes, sprinkling fertilizer, and planting the crabapple seedlings. Planting crabapple trees enhances wildlife habitat by providing a steady source of nutrients, as well as pollen for pollinators.

The property where the trees were planted is a Three Rivers Land Trust conserved property, and protects surface water quality as well as ecological diversity and wildlife habitat. Located prominently on Coddle Creek Reservoir, the property possesses 2,550 feet of stream frontage. In the past year and a half, Three Rivers Land Trust has conserved over 130 acres of land that adjoin Coddle Creek Reservoir, a primary drinking water source for Cabarrus County residents.

The Land Trust’s Leopold Society is designed to enlighten youth participants from grades 6 to 12 on the natural world and conservation issues. Participants learn conservation techniques, outdoor skills, and hands-on natural resource stewardship and service. They engage in outdoor recreation and skill-building activities. The long-term goal of the program is to instill a lifelong love of nature in youth participants that will translate into positive action as adults. To learn more about the Leopold Society, contact Steely Russell at 704-647-0302 or steely@threeriverslandtrust.org.

Three Rivers Land Trust Earns National Recognition

Land Trust Accredidation

Americans strongly support conserving this nation’s undeveloped natural resources. Since 1995, Three Rivers Land Trust has been doing just that for the people of North Carolina. Now Three Rivers Land Trust is announcing that it has renewed its land trust accreditation – proving once again that, as part of a network of over 400 accredited land trusts across the nation, it is committed to professional excellence and to maintaining the public’s trust in its conservation work.

 

“Renewing our accreditation demonstrates Three Rivers Land Trust’s ongoing commitment to permanent land conservation in North Carolina,” said Travis Morehead, Executive Director “As an organization, we are a stronger than ever for having gone through the rigorous accreditation renewal process. Our staff and board hold ourselves to the highest standards, so that we know the conservation work we do is as permanent as we promise. This is especially important to the landowners that entrust us with helping them conserve their properties.”

 

Three Rivers Land Trust provided extensive documentation and was subject to a comprehensive third-party evaluation prior to achieving this distinction. The Land Trust Accreditation Commission awarded renewed accreditation, signifying its confidence that Three Rivers Land Trust’s lands will be protected forever. Accredited land trusts now steward almost 20 million acres – the size of Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island combined.

 

Three Rivers Land Trust merged last year with the Sandhills Area Land Trust, expanding the organization’s territory by five new counties. In addition to renewing our accreditation, in 2019 Three Rivers Land Trust protected over 4,000 acres, connected thousands to the outdoors, doubled our membership base, and raised over $5 million in project funds through grants and private donations. Nearly 2,500 acres of those conserved last year went into public access, including the Alcoa High Rock Gamelands acquisition in partnership with the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission.

 

“It is exciting to recognize Three Rivers Land Trust’s continued commitment to national standards by renewing this national mark of distinction,” said Melissa Kalvestrand, executive director of the Commission. “Donors and partners can trust the more than 400 accredited land trusts across the country are united behind strong standards and have demonstrated sound finances, ethical conduct, responsible governance, and lasting stewardship.”

Three Rivers Land Trust is one of 1,363 land trusts across the United States according to the Land Trust Alliance’s most recent National Land Trust Census. A complete list of accredited land trusts and more information about the process and benefits can be found at www.landtrustaccreditation.org.

A Few Outdoor Adventures

On November 2nd, a couple of friends and myself took a hike at the 24/27 trailhead. It was a cold morning and the opening day of muzzleloader season, so there were a lot of vehicles parked on the side of the road on public land where hunters were eager to find a deer. We wore our orange so as to be seen, although hunters are supposed to keep a safe distance away from trails also.

 

We hiked on the mountain bike trails until you get to Wood Run Trailhead, then you hike a short way further on the Keyawee Trail before tying into the Uwharrie Trail. After hiking on it for a while, you’ll cut back onto Wood Run Road and take it back to the Wood Run Trailhead. Then we retraced our steps on the mountain bike trails back to 24/27. This is about 5 miles round trip. It was a great morning hike and we only saw a handful of mountain bikers so we almost had the trails to ourselves.

 

Last Friday, I hiked with several friends on the Uwharrie Trail from Highway 109 to Spencer Creek and back. I’ve done this hike a lot, but this was the first time for two of my friends to see this section of trail. It’s a nice section to do because there’s not too much topography, just a couple of small hills to climb on the way back. The fall color was really nice, and we’d had some rain the night before so there were also a good amount of brightly colored leaves carpeting the forest floor.

 

I was off on Monday for the Veterans Day Holiday, and it was a gorgeous day. The weather was perfect so I decided to take the opportunity to paddle, probably the last time for this year. A friend and myself put in at the Pekin access on the Little River at 2382 Pekin Road, just south of Troy. We paddled south on the river this time, towards the dam.

 

On our paddle, we saw a beaver lodge and a lot of wood duck boxes that had been installed along the river. There were even a few turtles out. When we stopped down near the dam, a bald eagle appeared and circled over us several times. There were several people working on the dam, which explained why the water was pretty low. They had pumped a lot of concrete on the western side and were working on the eastern side when we arrived. This dam still generates hydroelectric power.

 

On the way back, the water got really still and looked almost like glass. Then the breeze started up and pushed us much of the way back. We saw a monarch butterfly, one of only a few I’ve seen this year. There are quite a few really nice sycamore trees along this stretch, and the wind blowing through the leaves made for a pleasant sight and sound. I’ll miss kayaking now until the springtime, but it makes it mean that much more when I get to go again.

 

There’ll still be plenty of opportunities to hike and otherwise enjoy the outdoors this winter, too. I encourage you to find your own way to enjoy the outdoors, no matter the time of year. A friend of mine told me the other day that she was trying to spend more time being still. Taking time to be present in the moment is something nature offers us – there’s much to see and hear if you only take the time to stop and listen.

Three Rivers Land Trust Awards Stonewall Jackson Youth Development Center with Grant

On October 29th, Three Rivers Land Trust presented the Horticulture class at Stonewall Jackson Youth Development Center with a $500 grant toward improving their greenhouse and aquaponics system. This grant was made possible through a partnership with Three Rivers Land Trust and the Cabarrus County Community Foundation.

The students, led by teacher Terry Thomas, meet each morning to oversee all aspects of selecting, planting, maintaining, and harvesting plants.  Oftentimes the produce grown in the class is sent to the cafeteria to be used for meals served to students and staff.

The horticulture class includes a certification program broken into two-week modules. These modules are designed to teach the students skills that will prepare them for a future career in horticulture. Some of the modules available to the students are Soil Science, Composting, and Greenhouse Management.

Stonewall Jackson Youth Development Center, located in Concord, NC, is a rehabilitation center designed to give at-risk youth an opportunity to continue taking high school courses or obtain their GED.

 

The Land Trust’s Leopold Society is designed to enlighten youth participants from grades 6 to 12 on the natural world and conservation issues. Participants learn conservation techniques, outdoor skills, and hands-on natural resource stewardship and service. They engage in outdoor recreation and skill-building activities. Many of these activities are completed independently with the intent to bring families together in the outdoors. The long-term goal of the program is to instill a lifelong love of nature in youth participants that will translate into positive action as adults.

 

To learn more about how you can get your school involved in the Leopold Society, or how you can support Three Rivers Land Trust, contact Steely Russell at

704-647-0302 or steely@threeriverslandtrust.org

 

Contact

Phone

(704) 647-0302

Address

204 East Innes Street, Suite 280
Salisbury, NC 28144

Email

threerivers@threeriverslandtrust.org