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Three Rivers Land Trust Awarded $584,100 for Farmland Conservation Project

Three Rivers Land Trust is excited to announce they were awarded a $584,100 grant from the North Carolina Agricultural Development and Farmland Preservation Trust Fund for the purchase of a conservation easement on a 320-acre farm in Cabarrus County. This property adjoins a 60-acre farm that has been permanently conserved.

“Projects like this one are a priority for our organization because we focus on protecting productive farmland,” states Executive Director Travis Morehead. “Over 95% of the soils on this farm are prime or statewide important farmland soils. Since 1995, we have protected over 15,000 acres of farmland in our 15-county region.”

The primary products produced on this farm are beef and poultry.  In addition, this farm also focuses on agritourism, with a very popular wedding venue. The farmer and his wife along with his two sons and their spouses all work on the farm and all of the family members have a role to play. The entire family agreed that they wanted this land to stay a farm for perpetuity.

This project is phase one of a two phase project, and the second phase will see an additional 500 acres protected if funding is awarded next year. The state funding provides 25% of the cost of the purchase of the easement, and we will apply for matching funds from the USDA for an additional 50% of the cost this coming year. The landowner will be donating 25% of the easement value.

“Located in Cabarrus County, a rapidly developing county, the threat of development to this farm from the growth is very high. Protecting the family farm with a perpetual conservation easement ensures that this land can continue to be farmed for generations to come” states Crystal Cockman, Director of Conservation.

To learn more about how to protect your own property, or how to support Three Rivers Land Trust in our conservation mission, contact Crystal Cockman at 704-647-0302 or crystal@threeriverslandtrust.org

Three Rivers Land Trust permanently conserves 200 acres in Montgomery County on Drowning Creek

Three Rivers Land Trust (TRLT) is excited to announce the conservation of a 200-acre property located in Montgomery County in partnership with the North Carolina Clean Water Management Trust Fund. The landowners worked with TRLT to place the parcel under a permanent conservation easement in August of 2020. This conservation easement protects the property permanently from subdivision and development, ensures that the hardwood forest buffer remains intact, and the uplands remain as a working longleaf pine forest.

“We are excited that Ann and Tommie Rogers chose to work with TRLT to permanently conserve their property,” states Executive Director Travis Morehead. “This conserved property is located along Drowning Creek, a primary water supply for many Moore County residents. TRLT is committed to working with willing property owners to conserve tracts like this while they are still undeveloped.”

“Drowning Creek, is a high-quality watershed with several rare aquatic species found in the stream,” states Crystal Cockman, Director of Conservation. “By conserving this property, we are not only protecting important wildlife habitat in the increasingly-fragmented Sandhills region, but are also protecting the excellent water quality in the Drowning Creek watershed and the tributaries that flow through this property.” The North Carolina Clean Water Management Trust Fund provided funding for the riparian conservation easement on the Rogers property, and the Rogers donated an easement on the uplands.

The area presents an unusual combination of Piedmont and Coastal Plain ecology. Northern pine snakes, nonvenomous snakes which are endemic to the region, are known to occur nearby. The Drowning Creek watershed also contains native hardwood trees, and rocky outcrops and mountain laurel can be found along it. Prescribed fire is a management tool used here, which enhances important longleaf pine forest habitat. The North Carolina Sandhills are one of the last holdouts of native longleaf pine in the country – nationwide, three percent of the area that was once longleaf pine forest remains. Longleaf pine forests provide key habitat for a variety of species that characterize the North Carolina landscape, many of which are endangered or threatened.

Forest, wetland and farmland conservation have been a focus of TRLT since our inception, having protected more than 40,000 acres, with over 15,000 acres of farmland conserved, and 283 miles of river and stream frontage conserved since 1995.

To learn more about how to protect your own property, or how to support Three Rivers Land Trust in our conservation mission, contact Crystal Cockman at 704-647-0302 or crystal@threeriverslandtrust.org

Leopold Society Nature Bingo!

Leopold Society Nature Bingo!

We’ve created two scavenger hunts, one for the Piedmont and one for the Sandhills! Print the cards and circle the things you find – when you get four in a row you can post your completed scorecard on social media with the hashtag #ExploreWithTRLT and we’ll give you a shout-out on our own social media pages!

 

Three Rivers Land Trust ensures protection for historic Boone Homeplace in Davie County

Three Rivers Land Trust (TRLT) is thrilled to announce the completion of a project permanently protecting 82 acres of farmland in Davie County. In partnership with the North Carolina Agricultural Development and Farmland Preservation Trust Fund, who provided partial funding, this farm is now under a conservation easement, restricting the future development of the land and ensuring it will always remain a farm.

“We are happy to continue the long tradition of conserving local family farms. We are especially excited about forming new partnerships, not only with the property owner but also with Davie County Soil and Water Conservation District,” states Executive Director Travis Morehead. This easement is co-held by TRLT and Davie Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD), and is the first easement ever held by Davie SWCD. There is also an interesting historical link with this project.

This particular piece of land is unique in its connection to American pioneer Daniel Boone, whose family first settled in the area more than 200 years ago.  Boone met and married his wife, Rebecca Bryan Boone, in the summer of 1756.  The couple built a log a cabin and established their homestead a mile and a half southeast of Farmington, along Sugar Creek.  It is in this location that the Boones started their family, with five of their ten children being born here.  This site is believed to be located on this protected farm, known to historians as the “Daniel Boone Sugar Tree Creek Homeplace,” and from here Boone began his westward exploration.  Daniel and Rebecca raised their family here for more than a decade before moving on to what is now Wilkes County and ultimately on to Kentucky.

“I speak for all of the Davie Soil and Water Conservation District Board and employees when I say that we are very excited about the finalization of this important conservation easement. This easement will preserve the beautiful farmland for years and years to come. Development is very important for the growth of our community, but undisturbed natural landscape is equally so and our partnership with Three Rivers Land Trust will prove to be an invaluable resource for conservation now and into the future,” states Kevin S. Marion, Davie Soil and Water Conservation District Chairman.

“Protecting our natural resources, including fertile farmland, is more important than ever as recent American Farmland Trust statistics indicate that North Carolina is the second most susceptible state for conversion of farmland to other uses,” said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. “The United Nations predicts that food production will need to increase 75 to 100 percent by 2050 to meet the increasing demand from a growing population. Protecting farmland such as this site now will be critical to meet our future food needs. As a grandfather, I am grateful for these forward-focused conservation efforts.”

“Continuing the legacy of agriculture on the farm and protecting the historic significance of this site is important to this landowner, and now that heritage will be preserved permanently,” states TRLT Director of Conservation Crystal Cockman. “Farmland conservation has been a focus of TRLT since our inception, having protected more than 15,000 acres of farmland since 1995.”

Guest Blog Post by Naturalist Tom Earnhardt – Listening Carefully

Dear Tar Heel Family and Friends:

How fast can it fly? Where does it go in the winter? What does it eat? When will it come back next year? Why are they found only in one place? Who can I ask to learn more?

To anyone who has ever taught, and to parents and grandparents everywhere, these words— who, what, when, where, why, and how—are familiar words of wonder and growth in children! Curiosity is the love of learning manifested in words and actions. And contrary to what you might have heard, curiosity did not kill the cat; it expanded her world and made her wiser. 

Curiosity has always been a trait that I have most admired in others. Because of this, I value good questions at least as much as I do the “right answers.” Yet, as a society, we still tend to reward those able to accumulate the most right answers on final exams, SATs, and on graduate/professional tests. We want answers immediately, just like we need “next-day” delivery by Amazon and FedEx. In our system of rewards we have always put a high value on IQ (intelligence quotient). Again, for reasons I cannot explain, curiosity has simply never gotten the credit and respect it deserves. 

There are ways to measure and assess curiosity, but to the best of my knowledge it can’t be taught. I am convinced, however, curiosity can be nurtured and supported. For many years, I watched my own children and other young people stimulated and challenged by the natural world. Nothing elicits questions and fosters curiosity more than time in wild places. Try to remember your reaction the first time you saw the Milky Way painted across a remote night sky, stood on an ocean beach at sunrise, watched chevrons of geese and swans in the winter sky, or saw fireflies on a warm summer night. Such interactions with the natural world beg us to ask honest questions. 

Can you look into Linville Gorge and not ask how old, and how deep? Can you approach Pilot Mountain, rising 2,000 feet above the the Piedmont landscape, and not wonder what forces have shaped it over millions of years? Can you paddle among the ancient bald cypress of the Black River and not ponder how some have survived hurricanes, floods, and even fire for more than 2000 years? 

Sometimes the wild things come to you. A few weeks ago near downtown Raleigh, my daughter spotted a shy eastern box turtle lumbering across our backyard. Almost immediately we both begin to ask the same questions using familiar words. How old was this neighbor we had never met, knowing she can live up to 100 years? Where was the turtle born, since most live within a few hundred yards of where its mother laid her eggs? What does she eat in an urban neighborhood, and why had we never seen this gentle reptile before? 

Finally, there’s something magical about adult hummingbirds, weighing 1/10 of an ounce! Someone once pointed out to me that 10 hummingbirds could fly south for the winter for the cost of one first-class stamp. For 30 years I have welcomed ruby-throated hummingbirds to our yard in summer. I always have the same personal questions for each tiny new guest: where did you spend the winter, and how far did you fly to get here?  

The natural world has always been my family’s “curiosity laboratory.“ While hunkered down at home in this time of coronavirus, I am constantly reminded how fortunate we are in North Carolina to have myriad opportunities to associate with the natural world.  These opportunities—in the form of parks, natural areas, game lands, protected forests, and even wilderness beaches—are the result of the work of countless men and women over the past 100 years. I’d like to think these champions of the land understood the importance of wild places for the growth and success of our children. In these places, young North Carolinians are inspired to ask questions about the world around them. The same words of wonder—who, what, when, where, why, and how— invariably spill over into other parts of our lives. Curiosity frees us to explore new worlds with an open mind. 

Sadly, not all children have equal or ready access to the natural world. Some come from families who do no have the economic means for even minimal travel, while others come from schools and circumstances where time in nature is not a priority. As a consequence, too many young adults have never set foot on a North Carolina beach, stood on a mountain peak, or held a turtle in their hands. Without such experiences, good questions may not come naturally. And if we aren’t inspired to ask questions as children, we are less likely to feel comfortable asking them as adults.  

Discovery and growth are by-products of curiosity. Honest inquiry will not always give us the answers we expect, or provide them as quickly as we would like. I look forward to the time when I can again visit my favorite North Carolina wild places and hear the words and questions that tell me our children are growing. Our nation needs to hear them, too. 

Listening carefully for the words of wonder,

Tom

Do you remember the first time you stood on a Tar Heel beach and had a thousand questions about the ocean. How deep and how far? (Photo #1)

What were your questions the first time you saw formations of migratory waterfowl etched against a January sky? (Photo #2)

From the rim of Linville Gorge to the river below it is more than 1500 feet. How long did it take nature carve this Tar Heel masterpiece? (Photo #3)

Pilot Mountain is properly named. It can be seen for more than 50 miles away. This photo was taken looking south from Virginia. How old is “The Pilot” and how has it survived wind and erosion? (Photo #4)

Many ancient trees on the Black River show evidence of wind and water that have twisted trunks and branches over centuries and even millennia. What forces twisted the top of this tree? (Photo #5)

It was a surprise to see this eastern box turtle lumbering through our backyard near downtown Raleigh. How old is she, what does she eat, and where was she born? (Photo #6)

If you watch a hummingbird fly or hover more than a few times, you will invariably ask about the speed its wings? Photo #7 (Spoiler alert: The wings of a ruby-throated hummingbird can beat between 75 and 185 beats per second!)

Because we have approximately 3000 moths and butterflies in North Carolina I frequently see caterpillars that I cannot identify. This always leads to the question: what beautiful Lepidoptera will emerge from the caterpillar? (Photo #8)

Uwharrie Trail One Step Closer to Being Reconnected

Three Rivers Land Trust (TRLT) transferred a strategic seven-acre parcel to the Uwharrie National Forest on July 20. This important property fills a portion of the last gap along the historic Uwharrie Trail, in the section between High Pine Church Road and the southern end of the Birkhead Wilderness Area.

From this newly transferred parcel, hikers can now travel southward 28 miles on a single-track woods trail to the southern terminus of the Uwharrie Trail at Highway 24-27 in Troy. Thanks to a partnership between TRLT and the Uwharrie Trailblazers hiking club, eight miles of new trail have been opened in recent years between the Jumpin Off Rock trailhead and the Walkers Creek trailhead.

“Three Rivers Land Trust has worked over the past two decades to add more than 800 acres to the Uwharrie National Forest, as well as filled four of five gaps in the Uwharrie National Recreational Trail,” states Crystal Cockman, TRLT Director of Conservation. “We look forward to a time when the entire trail is reconnected, and we believe we have that vision in sight. This transfer is just one more important step in the process.”

“Projects like this one would not be possible without federal funding from the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF).  The funds used to add this property to the Uwharrie National Forest were generated from offshore oil and gas leases,” states Travis Morehead, TRLT Executive Director. “Historically, these funds have not been solely used for conservation, but instead have been reallocated by Congress for other purposes. The Great American Outdoor Act, championed by North Carolina, Senator Richard Burr, recently won approval with overwhelming bipartisan support in the U.S. Senate. President Trump has signaled that he would sign the bill into law, should it pass the U.S. House of Representatives.  A vote is scheduled for July 22, 2020. This bill would permanently authorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) for its rightful purpose, the conservation of our nation’s natural resources. We encourage the public to contact your local US House Representative to relay the importance on the momentous bill.”

On August 14, 2020 at 2 P.M. TRLT will host a ribbon cutting to celebrate this historical transfer to the Forest Service.

Guest Blog Post by Naturalist Tom Earnhardt

The Fourth of July has always been special. There are other national holidays, with religious or secular significance, but because it occurs during the warm vacation months, Independence Day generates more picnics, concerts, parades, and fireworks than the others. This year with a pandemic, a troubled economy, and an important national conversation about equality and racial justice, we have a lot on our plates as a state and nation. Celebrations this summer will be different and more subdued, with large gatherings put on hold because of the coronavirus.

 

As we observe the Fourth of July in our own ways, I remind myself that Nature also knows how to throw a party and mark important events. Granted, festivities in the natural world may not always coincide with our Independence Day, Christmas, New Year’s Eve, or Presidents’ Day, but I’d like to offer some examples of celebration in the wild. Of course, you may question whether Nature is capable of putting on a big soirée. After looking at the “evidence” below, I’ll let you draw your own conclusions.

 

As you’ve likely observed, we humans are particularly fond of celebratory sound in the form of great music, roaring engines, and even fireworks. We also like to celebrate by with “over-the-top“ decorations like garlands, colorful banners, and lights at Christmas. We are attracted to parades with marching bands, military armor, and brightly colored headgear. Finally, when we really want to pull out all the stops, we put on shows with aircraft performing aerobatics and flying in formation.

 

With all due respect to the ways you may be used to observing the Fourth, you can’t hold a candle to Nature! Let me start with sound. Almost any night in July, go to an isolated pond or freshwater wetland anywhere in North Carolina, preferably well away from a shopping center or interstate highway. I can almost guarantee that you will hear deep baritone voices singing “chug o’ rum…chug o’ rum…chug o’ rum.” Just last night, in Raleigh, I heard bullfrogs in a creek near our house. Listen closely, and you’ll also hear smaller frogs with equally distinctive voices. 

 

North Carolina is home to more than a dozen species of cicadas, and during the summer you are likely to hear a circadian chorus. Some sing in the heat of the day, while others provide nocturnal music. Additional members of the night chorus include North Carolina’s several species of owls. If you want to experience an owl symphony, try spending a night on the Roanoke River near Plymouth, or along the Neuse River near Kinston. Even on small waterways, like Morgan Creek in Chapel Hill, you can often hear multiple barred owls chanting “who…who…who cooks for you?” Biologists may tell you that cicadas and owls are trying to attract mates, but what if they are just having a good time?

 

We humans like to decorate, but Nature does it better. Is there anything more grand than an entire mountainside covered with rhododendron during the month of June? And have you ever seen large patches of flame azalea—oranges, yellows and golds—on several North Carolina highland “balds.” During the same months across much of eastern North Carolina you are likely to encounter ditches lined beautiful rose mallow. If such color displays are not a natural celebration, I don’t know what it is.

 

It may also be coincidence, but around the Fourth of July Nature tends to break out the red, white, and blue in both birds and wildflowers. There are red cardinals, summer tanagers, and scarlet tanagers. Lots of coastal birds dress in white, but my favorite is the great egret. Tar Heel birds wearing blue include indigo buntings, blue jays, and bluebirds. Many of our most beautiful wildflowers are red, but none are more stunning than columbine or the deep red Gray’s lily on our highest northwestern peaks. Throughout the summer, Nature also flouts several spectacular white flowers—southern magnolia, fairy wand and spider lily. Finally, the natural world of North Carolina offers multiple blue wildflowers, including spiderwort, monkshood, and blue flag iris (our largest native iris).

 

I told you that Nature is also into “armor” and showy military headgear. During warm months there are displays of shiny armor inland and on our coast. Most North Carolinians have seen our state reptile, the eastern box turtle, lumbering near a hiking trail, or perhaps crossing a road. North Carolina is also home to 20 other freshwater turtles with various carapace (the hard upper shell) shapes. In coastal waters you can see loggerheads, green turtles, and the giant leatherback. Five years ago on the Fourth of July, my wife and I watched a magnificent leatherback turtle, perhaps 8 feet in length, surface several times near Cape Lookout. Nature gave so many turtles to North Carolina that they must be part of a celebration. 

 

The first wildflower to totally capture my imagination in the 1950s was the Turk’s-cap Lily found along many mountain roads and the Blue Ridge Parkway. It may be our most spectacular summer wildflower—reaching 5 to 8 feet in height—often with more than a dozen speckled orange blooms. I’ve seen lots of marching bands and military parades, but none with headgear that can compete with the shape and colors of the Turk’s-cap lily.

 

Have you ever seen the Blue Angels or Thunderbirds perform? Nature also puts on air shows throughout the year. I don’t know what is more awe inspiring and celebratory than a sky full of pelicans or black skimmers on the edge of the Atlantic. Year-round it’s also possible to see a resident bald eagle high in the sky almost anywhere in North Carolina. During our cold months, from Thanksgiving to President’s Day, the sight and sounds of tens of thousands of swans and snow geese in the air at the same time will make you forget human celebrations. 

 

Other natural air shows that can be seen in wild places are much smaller, but equally magical. Several years ago near Elk Knob State Park I was attracted to a roadside patch of wildflowers, including Joe-Pye weed, ironweed, and Turk’s-cap lilies. As I walked closer to the flowers, dozens of large butterflies—swallowtails, fritillaries, and monarchs—arose in unison from the wildflowers. To this day, I cannot remember more beauty in a small place. Nature had to be celebrating something.

 

If you still doubt that the natural world has the ability to throw a party or put on a show, I don’t know what else to tell you. From my experience, no matter how, or where, you celebrate the Fourth of July, Labor Day, or New Year’s Eve, the natural world can top it! This week as we celebrate Independence Day here in North Carolina, take a few minutes and invite Nature to be part of the festivities, or better yet, see how Nature is celebrating. 

 

Wishing you a safe and happy Fourth of July,

Tom

 

There are many great voices in nature, but no summer songs of celebration are better than those of frogs (photo#1), cicadas (photo #2), and owls (photo #3)

Nature knows how to decorate hillsides with Catawba rhododendron (photo #4) and with “burning bushes,” like this fiery flame azalea on Roan Mountain (photo #5).

During spring and summer Nature displays many patriotic combinations of red, white, and blue in the world of birds and wildflowers. A good selection native wildflowers would cardinal flower (photo #6), spider lily  (photo #7), and blue flag iris (photo #8). I photographed these spider lilies in a Craven County wetland and the blue flag iris on the edge of a Hyde County canal.

With several species of giant sea turtles visiting our shores each summer, and some 20 different freshwater turtles, lots of Tar Heel “armor” can be included in Nature’s parades (photo #9).

The Turk’s-cap lily is arguably our most spectacular mountain wildflower of summer, reaching up to 8 feet in height with multiple blooms (photo #10).

Finally, from the mountains to coast, Nature loves air displays to celebrate important events. Bald eagles can be seen across North Carolina from the Blue Ridge to the Atlantic (photo #11). Among our most graceful birds are black skimmers shown here, which I photographed near Wrightsville Beach ((photo #12). Tundra swans and snow geese celebrate winter holidays with breath taking aerial displays (photo #13).

ExtremeTerrain’s Clean Trail Initiative Program Grants Land Trust Funds to Host Uwharrie Trail Work Day

Three Rivers Land Trust is proud to announce that the ExtremeTerrain’s Clean Trail Initiative Program has provided us with a $250 grant to assist with trail workdays on the Uwharrie National Recreational Trail throughout the year. This grant will assist with the purchase of supplies, equipment, refreshments, signs, and other essential items for trail workdays.

The Land Trust partners with the Uwharrie Trailblazers Club to host trail workdays every second Saturday each month of the year on the Uwharrie National Recreational Trail located in central North Carolina. This 40-mile trail is an incredible resource for the area, and has a variety of picturesque and challenging sections. The Land Trust has worked to fill gaps in the trail by working with the Uwharrie National Forest to acquire and transfer lands to them, and the trail can now be hiked in its 40-mile entirety.

Every October, Three Rivers Land Trust hosts a thru hike of the full 40-mile Uwharrie Trail with approximately 100 participants in partnership with the Uwharrie Trailblazers Club. A special trail workday will take place on October 10th and volunteers will assist the Land Trust and Trailblazers in helping get the trail ready for this event. The thru hike event is open for registration on the land trust website (www.threeriverslandtrust.org), and has just a few spots left for this year. This year’s thru hike event will take place October 15-18. Please stay tuned to our website for updates on trail workdays and the thru hike in relation to how the current COVID-19 situation might affect these events.

ExtremeTerrain is an off-road outfitter with a goal of providing customers with the most accurate and reliable information for making decisions regarding the purchase of off-road parts. ExtremeTerrain will help customers build their ultimate off-road vehicle with the dependable performance items they offer. ExtremeTerrain.com has experienced enthusiasts handle its customers’ service inquiries. They are passionate enthusiasts whose customers are the number one priority.

Three Rivers Land Trust works with private landowners and public agencies to conserve the most important natural, scenic, agricultural, and historic places in a 15-county region of the Piedmont and Coastal Plain of North Carolina. Since 1995, the Land Trust has worked to offer reasonable and attractive options to landowners who want to conserve their lands for future generations to enjoy. Our mission is to work thoughtfully and selectively with property owners to conserve our lands, vistas, and the essential nature of our region. For more information about Three Rivers Land Trust, please contact the Land Trust at 704-647-0302 or crystal@threeriverslandtrust.org or visit their website at www.threeriverslandtrust.org

To learn more about Three Rivers Land Trust or to sign up for trail workdays, please visit our website at www.threeriverslandtrust.org or contact the Uwharrie Trailblazers at uwharrietrailblazers@gmail.com.

 

Three Rivers Land Trust Receives Grant for New River Access From REI Co-op

Three Rivers Land Trust (TRLT) is excited to announce that it will be receiving support from the REI Co-op in the amount of $5,400 to assist with the development of a paddling access point on the Uwharrie River on Highway 49 near Asheboro, North Carolina. TRLT acquired 27 acres on the Uwharrie River on Highway 49 over two projects in 2018 and 2019.

The grant will assist with the development of a parking area on Highway 49 that will allow paddlers to access the river to launch canoes and kayaks. This stretch of the Uwharrie River does not currently have any formal access, and Highway 49 as a major highway does not offer the ability to park at the bridge and launch boats. The Uwharrie River is also a popular fishing destination, known for being the easternmost location for smallmouth bass.

As a member-owned co-op, REI invests deeply in stewardship of the outdoor places its members know and love. REI actively works with nonprofits across the country to steward and maintain local trails and public lands and connect people to the outdoors. This is the first co-op grant REI has given to TRLT, but they have been a strong supporter and partner of our annual Uwharrie Trail Thru Hike for the past 3 years.

“Three Rivers Land Trust is grateful to REI for supporting our efforts to expand recreational opportunities along the Uwharrie River,” states Executive Director, Travis Morehead. “We believe in connecting the public to local conservation, by opening up river accesses and expanding trails, and feel that this grant will help us provide a new and important river access for public usage in our region.”

 

In recent years, TRLT,  in partnership with the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, has helped open three new kayak accesses on the Uwharrie River on Low Water Bridge Road, Highway 109, and Dennis Road.. TRLT also helped the town of Star acquire a 30-acre park,  which is also a river access point, at the confluence of the East Fork and West Fork of the Little River. Since 1995, Three Rivers Land Trust has transferred over 5,700 acres to public agencies providing recreational opportunities for residents and tourists alike.

To learn more about this project or how you can support Three Rivers Land Trust, contact Crystal Cockman at 704-647-0302 or crystal@threeriverslandtrust.org. 

About Three Rivers Land Trust 

Three Rivers Land Trust works with private landowners and public agencies to conserve the most important natural, scenic, agricultural, and historic places in a 15-county region of the Piedmont and Coastal Plain of North Carolina. Since 1995, the Land Trust has worked to offer reasonable and attractive options to landowners who want to conserve their lands for future generations to enjoy. Our mission is to work thoughtfully and selectively with property owners to conserve our lands, vistas, and the essential nature of our region. For more information about Three Rivers Land Trust, please contact the Land Trust at 704-647-0302 or michael@threeriverslandtrust.org or visit their website at www.threeriverslandtrust.org

About REI

REI is a specialty outdoor retailer, headquartered near Seattle. The nation’s largest consumer co-op, REI is a growing community of more than 18 million members who expect and love the best quality gear, inspiring expert classes and trips, and outstanding customer service. REI has 162 stores in 39 states and the District of Columbia. If you can’t visit a store, you can shop at REI.com, REI Outlet or the free REI shopping app. REI isn’t just about gear. Adventurers can take the trip of a lifetime with REI’s active adventure travel company, a global leader that runs more than 250 itineraries across all continents. In every community where REI has a presence, professionally trained instructors share their expertise by hosting beginner-to advanced-level classes and workshops about a wide range of activities.   To build on the infrastructure that makes life outside possible, REI invests millions annually in hundreds of local and national nonprofits that create access to—and steward—the outdoor places that inspire us all.

 

 

 

 

Three Rivers Land Trust permanently conserves 250 acres in Harnett County on Upper Little River

Three Rivers Land Trust is excited to announce the conservation of a 250-acre property located in Harnett County. The landowner donated a permanent conservation easement on his longtime family farm in April 2020. This working lands conservation easement allows for continued agricultural and forestry practices, while restricting the future development and subdivision of this important parcel.

 

“Our staff is very grateful to have worked with this family to conserve such a remarkable property. We are also thankful for our partners at the Clean Water Management Trust Fund, who provided funding for transactional costs through their mini-grant program,” states Executive Director Travis Morehead. As a result of the mini-grant funding, the easement will also protect a forested riparian buffer on the Upper Little River and the tributaries that flow through this property.

 

“This newly protected property has considerable frontage along the Upper Little River in Harnett County,” states Crystal Cockman, Director of Conservation. “By conserving this property, we are not only protecting the agricultural land, forest land, and wildlife habitat but are also protecting water quality along the Upper Little River and the tributaries that flow through this property. We are committed to working with property owners to conserve tracts like these, while they are still available.”

It was important to this landowner that the legacy of agriculture continue on this farm in perpetuity. Farmland conservation has been a focus of the land trust since our inception, having protected more than 15,000 acres of farmland since 1995. Three Rivers Land Trust merged with the Sandhills Area Land Trust in 2019, and expanded our conservation footprint to include Harnett County and four additional counties in the Sandhills and Coastal Plain.

To learn more about how to protect your own property, or how to support Three Rivers Land Trust in our conservation mission, contact Crystal Cockman at 704-647-0302 or crystal@threeriverslandtrust.org

About Three Rivers Land Trust

Three Rivers Land Trust works with private landowners and public agencies to conserve the most important natural, scenic, agricultural, and historic places in a 15-county region of the Piedmont and Coastal Plain of North Carolina. Since 1995, the Land Trust has worked to offer reasonable and attractive options to landowners who want to conserve their lands for future generations to enjoy. Our mission is to work thoughtfully and selectively with property owners to conserve our lands, vistas, and the essential nature of our region. For more information about Three Rivers Land Trust, please contact the Land Trust at 704-647-0302 or michael@threeriverslandtrust.org or visit their website at www.threeriverslandtrust.org

Contact

Phone

(704) 647-0302

Address

204 East Innes Street, Suite 280
Salisbury, NC 28144

Email

threerivers@threeriverslandtrust.org